View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sun Sep 24, 2017 9:15 am



Reply to topic  [ 44 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3
 Indoor Breeding with Arduino 
Author Message

Joined: Mon Jul 03, 2017 1:03 pm
Posts: 16
Location: Oshawa Ontario
Post Re: Indoor Breeding with Arduino
Aussiemoo, I want to appreciate your dedication in your project and by posting results.

I hope you are still on BSF game, would like to hear an update from you or the project! Like you said, "an entrepreneur is someone that fails before other people"

My comments on the last phase of your project is that I don't think you used the right light color, and perhaps that explains a poor performance? I think we are interested in the photons of specific wavelengths, or in the photons of temperature colors, as well as providing the right photons intensity in terms of LUX. In mi experiment i will use 200W LED flood light with Daylight light rated at 6000 K, rather than yours rated as cool white at 3500 K, since i have researched is what comes close to been the color temperature of daylight at noon. I will also use fermented corn as an attractant for oviposition since it seems to be the favorite attractant for Mr. Tavarous' wild BSF traps.

Following Dr Tomberlin paper on the subject, the same one you quoted, they achieved 60% of mating with halogen (500nm to infrared & up) and none with the rare earth lamp (350-450 nm, some UV-A and violet). They also achieved the highest rate of mating and numbers at around 9 am and 10 am in wuhan hubei china, which i would think has a very bright, early day sunshine in that location.


My hypothesis is that the rare earth lamp experiment of the paper discards UV-A light. From the success of other people's indoor breeding generations throughout glass windows that filters UV-B light (but not UV-A), I think we could discard UV-B as important in the mating/fertilized eggs process. So it must be about proper wavelength/color temperature at the right intensity for sunlight at noon disregarding UV radiation then? I don't see many comments regarding the importance of infrared spectrum in insect's navigation either and how that can play a role in this process.

I'm conflicted with this thinking because most insects seem to see and like the lower spectrum of light, would love to hear anyone's thoughts on the matter. UV-B is also very important form of radiation for animals known to 'sunbath' such as lizards, since it helps with the calcium metabolism and vitamin D creation, so it's a bit disconcerting that this tropical, sun-loving insect does not need UV-B light.

Thanks all for sharing knowledge,
Rickydilia


Tue Jul 18, 2017 4:20 pm
Profile Send private message

Joined: Mon Jul 03, 2017 1:03 pm
Posts: 16
Location: Oshawa Ontario
Post Re: Indoor Breeding with Arduino
I also don't like the fact that we have to use AC current flicking at 60 Hz when some insects, like firefly or houseflies are known to see at very high frames per second, higher than 60 frames per second, enabling them to actually see the light flickering, so DC current may be more proper to use for lights, what do you guys think?


Tue Jul 18, 2017 4:33 pm
Profile Send private message

Joined: Mon Jul 03, 2017 1:03 pm
Posts: 16
Location: Oshawa Ontario
Post Re: Indoor Breeding with Arduino
I mixed up my numbers and thinking, you used cool white 5500 K, which has a lot of blue, i belive that green-red (warm white) with 2900-3200K would be a better choice of colors.


Sat Jul 22, 2017 2:02 am
Profile Send private message
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2017 9:39 pm
Posts: 6
Location: Lakewood, CO
Post Re: Indoor Breeding with Arduino
Rickydilia wrote:
I also don't like the fact that we have to use AC current flicking at 60 Hz when some insects, like firefly or houseflies are known to see at very high frames per second, higher than 60 frames per second, enabling them to actually see the light flickering, so DC current may be more proper to use for lights, what do you guys think?


I thought that was an interesting point so I googled that and I think that incandescent lights have little to no flicker. CFL's / FL's do flicker at the frequency of their balast, which may be double or more of the line frequency. And LED's, which internally convert the AC to DC, may or may not flicker depending on the design of their voltage conversion circuit. An easy test to look for flicker is to put the light on an extension cord and swing it around in a circle at various speeds.

I see there's a cheap UVA sensor https://www.adafruit.com/product/2899 and a UVA+B sensor https://www.adafruit.com/product/1918available too, might be interesting.


Wed Sep 13, 2017 3:30 pm
Profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 44 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware for PTF.