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 Bokashi composting and BSF 
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Post Bokashi composting and BSF
I have never done much composting of any kind, but the bokashi method has drawn my interest lately.

From Wikipedia:
Quote:
Bokashi is a method that uses a mix of microorganisms to cover food waste to decrease smell. It derives from the practice of Japanese farmers centuries ago of covering food waste with rich, local soil that contained the microorganisms that would ferment the waste. After a few weeks, they would bury the waste that weeks later, would become soil.[13]

Most practitioners obtain the microorganisms from the product Effective Microorganisms (EM1),[13] first sold in the 1980s. EM1 is mixed with a carbon base (e.g. sawdust or bran) that it sticks to and a sugar for food (e.g. molasses). The mixture is layered with waste in a sealed container and after a few weeks, removed and buried.[13]

The EM are natural lactic acid bacteria, yeast, and phototrophic bacteria. Once a starter culture is made, it can be used to extend the culture indefinitely, like yogurt culture.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compost#Bokashi


I've seen a few reports that bokashi compost and tea are excellent attractants for BSF so that's my main purpose in researching it.

Quote:
Now What Do I Do?

Now that you have the output of your Bokashi the question is what can you do with it and there are a number of options –

Add it to your existing outdoor composter if you have one
Add it to a worm farm if you have one of those
Dig it in directly into one of your veggies patches as is.
Use it to attract black soldier flies. This is the stuff of a whole ‘nother article but briefly you can use you bokashi output in a commercial or homemade black soldier fly larvae farming set up. This set up induces the black soldier fly to lay eggs in or around vegetable waste then captures the larvae (maggots) as they go looking for soil to pupate in. The maggots can then be fed to chooks or fish in an aquaculture system. I have found that the bokashi material attracts black soldier fly like nothing else!

From: Under The Choko Tree - Making your Own Bokashi Bucket


For those who culture BSF outdoors, and do so only seasonally, bokashi composting sounds like a great way to manage household food waste during the BSF off-season.

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*I'm not an entomologist, and much of what I write about BSF is an educated guess.


Fri Feb 22, 2013 4:13 pm
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Post Re: Bokashi composting and BSF
Athelas from South Africa notes (link):

"A note on the Bokashi:
Leaving it out in the open does not seem to attract BSF, putting it through a blender and adding about 20% water seems to bring them around.
I use de-chlorinated water, i.e. Water that's been allowed to stand for a few days, to get rid of the treatment plant additives.
"

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I Believe The Black Soldier Fly Has The Potential To Be A Beneficial Insect Second Only To Pollinating Bees


Fri Feb 22, 2013 6:05 pm
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Post Re: Bokashi composting and BSF
BorealWormer wrote:
Athelas from South Africa notes (link):

"A note on the Bokashi:
Leaving it out in the open does not seem to attract BSF, putting it through a blender and adding about 20% water seems to bring them around.
I use de-chlorinated water, i.e. Water that's been allowed to stand for a few days, to get rid of the treatment plant additives.
"

Thanks BW. No mention of that from the source I quoted or from a video I watched from someone else who attracts BSF with bokashi. Maybe it makes a difference what you've composted? Or maybe bokashi isn't any better than the baits we've been using. As usual, a lot more questions than answers. :)

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*I'm not an entomologist, and much of what I write about BSF is an educated guess.


Fri Feb 22, 2013 6:34 pm
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Joined: Sat Feb 16, 2013 1:30 am
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Post Re: Bokashi composting and BSF
Nice I'd be interested in learning more about it.


Fri Feb 22, 2013 11:02 pm
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Joined: Mon Mar 21, 2011 3:26 am
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Post Re: Bokashi composting and BSF
I know nothing about bokashi, except that fermentation is part of the process, and we know BSF like fermentation (soaked corn, brewery waste, etc.)
I've found that a bucket of pumpkin is a great attractor, especially after a few days when it starts to get bubbly. As an added benefit, it actually smells quite pleasant. :)

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Sat Feb 23, 2013 9:36 am
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