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 Inoculating poultry manure with companion bacteria 
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Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2015 4:59 am
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Location: Perth, Western Australia
Post Inoculating poultry manure with companion bacteria
Yu, Guohui, et al. "Inoculating poultry manure with companion bacteria influences growth and development of black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae." Environmental entomology 40.1 (2011): 30-35.

http://forensicentomology.tamu.edu/pdf/Yu%20et%20al%202011.pdf

Quote:
The growth and development of black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.), larvae fed chicken manure inoculated with bacteria isolated from black soldier fly larvae and associated larval feed was evaluated. Four strains of Bacillus subtilis were evaluated. B. subtilis strains S15, S16, S19, were isolated from the gut of black soldier fly larvae. B. natto strain D1 was isolated from the diet fed to black soldier fly larvae. These bacteria were added individually into nonsterile 200 g fresh hen manure at 106 cfu/g and homogenized. Treated manure was then inoculated with 4-d old black soldier fly larvae. Prepupal weight ranged from 0.0606 g in the control to 0.0946 g in manure treated with the S15 strain. Larval survivorship to the prepupal stage in all treatments ranged from 98.00 ± 2.65% to 99.33 ± 1.15%. Prepupal survivorship to the pupal stage ranged from 91.92 ± 1.87% to 97.95 ± 1.03%. Adult emergence from the pupal stage did not significantly (P < 0.05) differ across treatments and ranged from 98.95 ± 1.82% to 100.00 ± 0.00%. Adult body length resulting from the larvae in each of the treatments was significantly greater than those from the control. Longevity of adults did not differ significantly between treatments. Time from hatching to the development of the first pupa did not differ significantly across treatments; however, development time from hatching to 90% reaching the prepupual stage was significantly different between treatments and ranged from 29.00 ± 1.00 d to 34.33 ± 3.51 d. Development time from hatching to 90% reaching the adult stages was significantly different between treatments. Our results demonstrate that inoculating poultry manure with bacteria from black soldier fly larvae influences the growth and development of conspecific larvae feeding on the manure.


. In conclusion, at the same density of population, adding micro-organisms could increase the gain of black soldier by up to 22%

People have been coming up with novel applications for leachate, but if it contains the same microorganisms as the substrate does, as would seem likely, then perhaps using a spray bottle or atomiser to prepare new foods by inoculating them with bacteria would be more useful.


Fri Aug 21, 2015 1:51 am
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Post Re: Inoculating poultry manure with companion bacteria
Aussiemoo wrote:
...
Quote:
... Our results demonstrate that inoculating poultry manure with bacteria from black soldier fly larvae influences the growth and development of conspecific larvae feeding on the manure.

Had to look up conspecific
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/conspecific
"An organism belonging to the same species as another"

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I Believe The Black Soldier Fly Has The Potential To Be A Beneficial Insect Second Only To Pollinating Bees


Fri Aug 21, 2015 8:51 am
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Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2015 9:41 am
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Location: Riverside, MO
Post Re: Inoculating poultry manure with companion bacteria
This is pretty cool...

My flies seem to be getting smaller each generation... I've been guessing that it's due to underfeeding and poor weather/bin conditions.

Right now I'm turning all of my pupae back into the breeding tent... but I'm rapidly reaching a point where I may start to be more selective - like sift the larger pre-pupae out for brood stock and give away/release the runts (until I've got critters to eat them).

I'm sure they are all genetically similar, and I'm hoping that if I optimize conditions I'll start getting larger insects again. It seems like the larger individuals are more robust and energetic, and likely can produce more viable eggs.

Anyway, I hope there's a practical application for this that we hobbyists could make use of outside the laboratory ;)


Wed Sep 09, 2015 3:14 am
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