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 Shells of Black Soldier Fly pupae 
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Post Shells of Black Soldier Fly pupae
First time I've seen the 'Shells of Black Soldier Fly pupae' (called puparia - link) marketed by anyone. Dipterra.com based out of Portland OR (link - at the bottom of the page)

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Shells of Black Soldier Fly pupae

Pupae shells of BSF are introduced in food mixtures for fish and birds as a source of calcium and sugars, and can be used to extract chitin (a source material for producing chitosan).

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BorealWormer

I Believe The Black Soldier Fly Has The Potential To Be A Beneficial Insect Second Only To Pollinating Bees


Tue Sep 18, 2012 8:47 pm
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Post Re: Shells of Black Soldier Fly pupae
From the BioSystems Design Blog's "A Primer on Black Soldier Fly"
http://biosystemsblog.com/black-soldier-fly/

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Regarding Chitin extraction, additional future studies of black soldier fly larvae are likely to investigate the chitin levels of the larvae as it is theorized that chitin in the larvae exoskeleton may cause a slightly higher feed conversion ratio (gram fed/gram weight gained) as the chitin is indigestible. However, this same Chitin has a relatively high market price ($10-$1000/kg depending upon quality) and extraction of the chitin from the larvae as an industrial process could become an additional revenue stream. This is already the case for the shrimping industry in many nations including Newfoundland. Applications for Chitin include waste-water treatment to bond to heavy metals as it is insoluble in nearly all solvents, chitin as a vehicle for drug delivery, film for fruit preservation, and fiber structures for wound and burn dressing.

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BorealWormer

I Believe The Black Soldier Fly Has The Potential To Be A Beneficial Insect Second Only To Pollinating Bees


Sat Jun 15, 2013 8:54 am
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Post Re: Shells of Black Soldier Fly pupae
"...the chitin is indigestible."

I doubt that as a blanket statement. It may not be totally digestible, but I strongly suspect that poultry can absorb some of it. I'm not sure about ruminants, unless it was fed dried and ground.

My chickens and ducks have access to oyster shell as a calcium source for the eggshells. Without it, they would lay eggs with thin, delicate shells. If they can absorb calcium from the shell chips (which seem harder than BSF shells), I don't see why they wouldn't from the "puparia" exoskeletons.

Let me stop for a moment and ask for some definitions:
*What are the young white larvae called?
*What are they called when they turn brown?
*Is there any other name for them when they migrate to pupate?

Has anyone come across info on the calcium content of the white ones? I assumed that the calcium comes from the "shell", but that may not be correct. Dr. O lists the nutritional content of them, but wouldn't it vary according to their current instar? Has anyone run across a breakdown on nutrient levels according to their size?

Sue


Sat Jul 20, 2013 3:41 am
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Post Re: Shells of Black Soldier Fly pupae
I just googled "black soldier fly nutritional content by instar":

The sixth instar is called "prepupae" -- is that the same as puparia? So the white ones are just called "larvae"?

So, when people order "Phoenix worms", they're getting the white larvae, I'm assuming. And they contain high levels of calcium, even though they don't have a "shell" yet?

"In addition, many experts believe that the high calcium content of the larvae (also called "phoenix worms") may halt or reverse the effects of metabolic bone disease. This biomass, of larvae harvested nutrients, is worth about the same as meat and bone or fishmeal." http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/beneficials/beneficial-51_black_soldier_fly.htm

The Jeffrey Tomberlin article says the larvae ingest calcium and convert it to calcium carbonate. That's chalk, isn't it? Why would that not be digestible by livestock when humans take it as a calcium supplement?

I guess just because someone posts it on the internet doesn't necessarily mean it's true... :o

Sue


Sat Jul 20, 2013 4:02 am
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Post Re: Shells of Black Soldier Fly pupae
BelgianPup wrote:
So, when people order "Phoenix worms", they're getting the white larvae, I'm assuming.
Mostly. The photo shows a cup of 100 "Phoenix worms".

130 light and 13 dark (mature) BSF larvae in the original shipping medium.
Image

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Sat Jul 20, 2013 11:42 am
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Post Re: Shells of Black Soldier Fly pupae
So I have a boatload of empty pupa shells. Shall I hold onto them and wait for a marketable product to develop? Are there folks currently sourcing any value associated with empty pupa shells.


Fri May 16, 2014 12:55 am
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Post Re: Shells of Black Soldier Fly pupae
My tilapia readily consume them, but I'm careful not to feed too any as I totally don't know what they contain and how they're effecting the overall health of my fishes.
Of course they also love all intar stages too.


Mon May 19, 2014 2:32 pm
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