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 BSFL in tropical Africa 
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Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2016 8:59 am
Posts: 4
Post BSFL in tropical Africa
I have a number of contacts in African countries that want to start BSF projects but are having problems and can get no help.
Those organisations that have succeeded in breeding BSF seem to maintain secrecy.
Has anyone experience of this and how it can be overcome?

Graham K


Tue Feb 16, 2016 6:54 am
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Joined: Mon Nov 25, 2013 12:45 pm
Posts: 9
Post Re: BSFL in tropical Africa
I experienced the same thing when I was in Rwanda.

The American companies that I knew had Soldier Fly won't ship larvae to me and I couldn't even get my hands on a biopod.

If I can do anything to help you, now that I'm back in the states, then please ask.

Maurice


Tue Feb 16, 2016 4:10 pm
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Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2016 8:59 am
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Post Re: BSFL in tropical Africa
I'm not sure you had the same problem!
I have posted BSFL from the UK to various African countries so they can recognise the larvae when they come across them.
Several organisations are trying to breed BSF but even the NGOs are reluctant to give any useful info.

Here is a typical report:

When i got interested about BSF i started looking around to see if i could find the flies in the wild, i found some in Arusha Tanzania, then i happen to get information that someone at the coast of Mombasa was doing some work, i visited them and found they are doing some but on a very small scale and there are many flies in the wild at the coat, infact they get larva from wild flies they don't breed them.
Since i am trying to breed the flies in captivity i have found none who will part with info, i was shocked with Sanergy, as i mentioned they refused to part with info, i am told that they have some connections with Agri-protein of south Africa who will never give out any info at all.
I also dont understand why BSF breeding is a big secret world wide. I am quit determine to give it a go as a commercial producer to make especially fish and chicken food because the protein for the feed is getting scares and expensive.
My problem is that i am unable to get the flies to mate, and the pupae take too long to hatch into flies this is why i am seek for help.

Regards

Ernest

Hi Graham,
Very interesting report, when i started looking into BSF I heard about a project in the Kiambu area but i could not get any contact. just to tell you a bit about myself, i am born in Kenya and i run a bee keeping operation, which i have been doing for 22 years in Kenya, i know the country very well, i am quit involved in community projects which in these part of the world are not a success story at all.


Wed Feb 17, 2016 5:46 am
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Joined: Mon Nov 25, 2013 12:45 pm
Posts: 9
Post Re: BSFL in tropical Africa
If I can do anything to help you from America, then please let me know.


Sat Feb 20, 2016 5:50 pm
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Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2016 8:59 am
Posts: 4
Post Re: BSFL in tropical Africa
Hi,

Although in the UK I support a number of community projects in African countries.
If you send me your email address or email me at biodesigndiy@gmail.com I will send you our newsletters!

Graham


Sun Feb 21, 2016 5:23 am
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Joined: Wed Jun 17, 2015 1:47 am
Posts: 25
Post Re: BSFL in tropical Africa
Hi,
I am trying to develop BSF project in Kenya and have encountered the same information road blocks.
I have managed to progress someway along the road to reasonable production through my own trial and error.
The insect research organisation ICIPE are very helpful (yes, refreshing) and I am very happy to share the little knowledge and experience I have accumulated.


Thu Jun 02, 2016 4:44 am
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Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2016 8:59 am
Posts: 4
Post Re: BSFL in tropical Africa
Dear Samaki,

I have given up on BSF for now!
I have got the impression that the fly can only be bred naturally in a few tropical countries.
Most are bred indoors under special lighting that simulates the 'best' sun.
Without near constant sunlight the breeding cycle for large numbers of larvae breaks down

Now I am trying to persuade my small farmer contacts to try vermiculture which is much more certain and has started in Kenya. So far this is used just to produce wonderful compost but can be used to mostly produce worms which are fed to hens, pigs, etc - as in USA!


Thu Jun 02, 2016 5:31 am
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