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 Drainage/filter concepts for BSF units 
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Post Re: Drainage/filter concepts for BSF units
Thanks Peter. Where have you used the epoxy putty?

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Mon Mar 04, 2013 12:47 pm
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Post Re: Drainage/filter concepts for BSF units
I came up with a new idea for a removable/washable filter system for a BSF unit with at least one wall that is mostly vertical. The filter can be removed for cleaning and also for allowing a stream of water to clear the area between the two pipe sections.

I would also like to test this without the outer perforated pipe and filter for a simplified approach.


Attachments:
vertical filter system concept for bsf composter.jpg
vertical filter system concept for bsf composter.jpg [ 90.61 KiB | Viewed 1708 times ]

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Mon Mar 04, 2013 12:59 pm
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Post Re: Drainage/filter concepts for BSF units
After a little more thought about the above concept; I think the outer pipe is all that is needed. The main question I have is how many larvae will exit the waste via the perforations in the pipe section? My biggest concern is that by placing it along the edge of the unit a large number of mature larvae would take these perforations as an exit and drop into the liquid waste. One possible fix for that is to use a whole pipe and place it away from the perimeter of the unit. I have a few ideas about that which I'm considering.

The thing I like about this line of thought is that the drain holes (perforations) on the pipe go from top to bottom of the waste. This way the effluent can find an exit no matter what level it is tending to pool at. In other words; while most drainage systems require the effluent to perk to the very bottom of the waste, this system allows it to drain from higher levels.

Of course this was inspired by PeteB's design early in this thread: Peter's post. The main difference is that I'm being stubborn about wanting to perforate the pipe. I'm not trying to annoy Peter :), I just want to see if I can speed up and improve drainage by making holes that the effluent can drain from in the middle levels of the waste.

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Mon Mar 04, 2013 10:07 pm
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Post Re: Drainage/filter concepts for BSF units
Hey, I can only comment on stuff I've tried myself. You'll never know for sure unless you make one. :D


Mon Mar 04, 2013 10:26 pm
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Post Re: Drainage/filter concepts for BSF units
Quote:
Where have you used the epoxy putty?


Attachments:
Putty.jpg
Putty.jpg [ 27.13 KiB | Viewed 1697 times ]
Mon Mar 04, 2013 10:51 pm
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Post Re: Drainage/filter concepts for BSF units
PeteB wrote:
You'll never know for sure unless you make one. :D

I know, I'll actually build something soon. ;)

One reason it's taking me a while is that I haven't focused on BSF for over a year and it's taking a while to put my thoughts together. For example; I've already scrapped the idea a few posts up for a variation on that theme. Here's the newest version:
Attachment:
vertical filter system concept for bsf composter version 2.jpg
vertical filter system concept for bsf composter version 2.jpg [ 125.87 KiB | Viewed 1679 times ]

Here's the type of fence post I'm referring to for the vertical drain - I chose a square shape to make it easier to attach the drain outlet:
Attachment:
vinyl fence post.jpg
vinyl fence post.jpg [ 35.95 KiB | Viewed 1679 times ]


One thing I'm still working on is how to anchor the square drain pipe to the bottom of the unit.

As always, criticism is welcomed. :)

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Tue Mar 05, 2013 10:06 am
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Post Re: Drainage/filter concepts for BSF units
It occurred to me that a vertical perforated drain pipe might encourage BSFL to eat more in the lower levels of the waste. Any larvae that drop into the drain will be able to crawl back up the inside walls of the drain due to high moisture levels there. They may crawl back through one of the lower perforations which might encourage them to eat at lower levels.

There may be another advantage to this system if larvae drop into the drain pipe and then re-enter the waste. This two-way traffic might help aerate the waste where it needs it the most, if the larvae re-enter at lower levels.

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Tue Mar 05, 2013 11:10 am
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Post Re: Drainage/filter concepts for BSF units
Jerry wrote:
It occurred to me that a vertical perforated drain pipe might encourage BSFL to eat more in the lower levels of the waste. Any larvae that drop into the drain will be able to crawl back up the inside walls of the drain due to high moisture levels there. They may crawl back through one of the lower perforations which might encourage them to eat at lower levels.

There may be another advantage to this system if larvae drop into the drain pipe and then re-enter the waste. This two-way traffic might help aerate the waste where it needs it the most, if the larvae re-enter at lower levels.


I've almost got the trial version of a vertical drain pipe finished and something occurred to me. If the drain holes became clogged you could collect several thousand juvenile larvae and dump them into the inside of the pipe. I believe the larvae would crawl up and back into the waste through the drain holes therefore helping unclog the drain.

I hope to publish my new experimental design in a few days.

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Mon Mar 18, 2013 11:54 pm
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Post Re: Drainage/filter concepts for BSF units
I've posted the new composter design with the experimental vertical drain pipe here: LINK

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Sat Mar 23, 2013 3:32 pm
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Post Re: Drainage/filter concepts for BSF units
In my experience, drainage depends largely on the type of feedstock you use. Running four bins this season, I was able to make side-by-side comparisons.
For example, the cow manure is full of coarse particles; these particles build up to form a natural filter which drains beautifully. On the other hand, large amounts of soft fruit turn everything into a swampy mess which is extremely difficult to drain. No two bins are the same, and each one has it’s own dynamics.

On a practical note, I found that crushed leaf-litter improves the drainage. I add a handful or so at every feeding. It’s job is not to absorb moisture, but rather to loosen up the bedding, so the water can get down to the drain. I’m sure coir will do the same thing.

Grub population also plays a role. Five thousand grubs do a huge amount of aerating and tunnelling, whereas a colony of five hundred is barely noticeable.


Mon Apr 01, 2013 10:07 pm
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Post Re: Drainage/filter concepts for BSF units
Hello, i am new to BSF and was wondering about drainage and flooding. I see that lot of people are flooding their BSF units. Is it necessary?
Another question, I heard that BSF poo was rely good as a soil supplement. Is anyone harvesting that and how would you go about it.
One idea I got was to have the floor of the larva / feeding unit as a complete strainer, hoping that all of the larva poo and leftovers would degrade and fall through. And if that is not possible are people taking everything out to clean the units once in a while?

Good times, Bui


Tue Feb 11, 2014 6:58 am
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Post Re: Drainage/filter concepts for BSF units
bjarmar wrote:
Hello, i am new to BSF and was wondering about drainage and flooding. I see that lot of people are flooding their BSF units. Is it necessary?
BSFL bins can generate a lot of liquids as a result of the larvae feeding which can free up a lot of liquid in a hurry from their feed stock. Adequate drainage is a problem as the fine castings tend to clog off filters, drains, etc. Flushing is one way maintaining adequate drainage.

Quote:
Another question, I heard that BSF poo was rely good as a soil supplement. Is anyone harvesting that and how would you go about it.
BSFL bins are a seasonal operation in most parts of the world and the bins would be cleaned out after they've gone idle for the year. The 'fras' or castings are a good soil amendment and some folks also use it as a feed stock for vermiculture (worms) bins. Vermicompost is an established product which is thought to be easier to market.

Quote:
One idea I got was to have the floor of the larva / feeding unit as a complete strainer, hoping that all of the larva poo and leftovers would degrade and fall through.
One problem would be that the larvae start out very small so they would escape through the screen too.

Quote:
And if that is not possible are people taking everything out to clean the units once in a while?
Answered above.

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Tue Feb 11, 2014 11:06 am
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