Are black soldier flies an invasive species?

Are black soldier flies an invasive species?

First, a definition… Biology-online.org defines an invasive species as a “Non-native species disrupting and replacing native species. Black soldier flies are thought to have originated in the southeastern United states. If so, then they are non-natives, at least in other countries, but are they disrupting and replacing other species? Are BSF in Washington state or Connecticut non-native? I don’t claim to be an authority…

BSF article by Harvey Ussery

BSF article by Harvey Ussery

Black Soldier Fly, White Magic Harvey Ussery authored an article titled “Black Soldier Fly, White Magic” first published in Backyard Poultry Magazine The article in the October/November 2009 issue fills 4 pages and includes photos of a BSF adult (from this site). In addition to my photos Harvey also used photos by Bonnie Long. Harvey describes the basics of the BSF…

Black soldier fly composting smells good…

If you added the food shown above to a properly functioning BSF composter it would smell like those foods more than anything else. I have experienced this many times. The most dramatic instance was when I added an entire loaf of stale cinnamon bread to my 5 gallon DIY bucket composter which I keep by the back door of our house. I walked by the composter a few hours after adding the bread and I was surprised by the delicious aroma of cinnamon. It’s not that the odor was just tolerable, it was appealing.